Top Stories

Cleaning up the plastic in the ocean

–CBS News
35 minutes ago

Discarded plastic is piling up around the world and pooling in the ocean. Sharyn Alfonsi reports on the problem's deadly consequences for wildlife and what can be done to stop it.

Fighting climate change will help economic growth, study finds

–Bloomberg
2 hours ago

ZURICH (BLOOMBERG) - Slowing the pace of climate change in line with the Paris Agreement has clear economic benefits as global warming is increasingly seen as a risk to financial stability and the economy.. Read more at straitstimes.com.

Climate Collapse: is AI the Antidote?

–Forbes
2 hours ago

In this five-part series on trends in learning, we’ve covered 12 trends at various stages of maturity, but none of them compare to the climate crisis—nothing is more important or more imminent. This post considers four impacts of the climate crisis on education.

Mobile forests could help cities cope with climate change

–Climate News
2 hours ago

Cities across Europe are trialling schemes such as roof gardens and ‘mobile forests’ to embed more nature into urban areas in an effort to protect their citizens from climate change events like heatwaves, floods and droughts.

Study finds invasive insects are a big contributor to climate change

–Climate News
15 hours ago

Invasive insects like the gypsy moth and emerald ash borer — which are steadily marching across Minnesota and the rest of the country, feasting on trees and ultimately killing them — are also contributing to climate change, according to a newly released study.

A Capital City in the Jungle? It’s Not a Crazy Idea

–Bloomberg
15 hours ago

(Bloomberg Opinion) -- Indonesia’s president wants to spend at least $30 billion to move the capital to a forest on the island of Borneo. The proximate trigger is climate change – Jakarta is sinking into the sea. President Joko Widodo is planning a giant wall to keep big waves out, but global warming

Sinking city: Indonesia's capital on brink of disaster

–AFP
1 day ago

Time is running out for Jakarta. One of the fastest-sinking cities on earth, environmental experts warn that one third of it could be submerged by 2050 if current rates continue. Relocating the country's administrative and political heart may be an act of national preservation, but it effectively

The solar storage energy revolution

–The Week
2 days ago

Solar panels may be the eco-friendly solution to energy, especially in places where the electric grid can be unreliable

Don’t Burn Trees to Fight Climate Change—Let Them Grow

–New Yorker
3 days ago

Countries and public utilities around the world are trying to reduce carbon emissions by burning wood pellets for fuel instead of coal, but recent studies have shown that the practice will have disastrous effects.

Trump wrong Again: Offshore Wind a "New Industrial Revolution"

–Climate News
3 days ago

The cost of wind power has fallen to a tenth of what it was 40 years ago. The United States now has enough wind installations to power 28 million homes, and we get 6.5% of our electricity from this source, says Ben German at Axios. He says new wind installations can generate electricity at 2 cents per kilowatt hour; coal is usually counted as 5 cents a kilowatt hour and so is more than twice as expensive.

Trump Wants To Buy Greenland

–Huffington Post
3 days ago

Sources tell The Wall Street Journal that Trump has asked White House counsel to look into buying the ice-covered Danish territory.

Restoring Soil can Help Address Climate Change

–Climate News
3 days ago

I believe it’s time now for a global “soilshot” to heal the land. Rebuilding healthy fertile soil on the world’s agricultural lands would require fundamental changes to agriculture, and a new agricultural philosophy.

Climate change threatens US West river despite wet winter

–Associated Press
4 days ago

FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) - Snow swamped mountains across the U.S. West last winter, leaving enough to thrill skiers into the summer, swelling rivers and streams when it melted, and largely making wildfire restrictions unnecessary. But the wet weather can be misleading. Climate change means the region is still getting drier and hotter. "It only demonstrates the wide swings we have to manage going forward," James Eklund, former director of the Upper Colorado River Commission, an interstate agency that ensures river water is doled out properly, said earlier this year. "You can put an ice cube - even an excellent ice cube - in a cup of hot coffee, but eventually it's going to disappear." For the seven states relying on the Colorado River, which carries melted snow from the Rocky Mountains to the Gulf of California, that means a future with increasingly less water for farms and cities. Climate scientists say it's hard to predict how much less. The river supplies 40 million people in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming as well as a $5-billion-a-year agricultural industry. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation on Thursday will release its projections for next year's supply from Lake Mead, a key reservoir that feeds Colorado River water to Nevada, Arizona, California and Mexico. After a wet winter, the agency isn't expected to require any states to take cuts to their share of water. But that doesn't mean conditions are improving long term. Arizona, Nevada and Mexico could give up some water voluntarily in 2020 under a drought contingency plan approved by the seven states earlier this year. Here is a look at the Colorado River amid climate change: COLORADO RIVER FLOW Much of the water in the Colorado River and its tributaries originates as snow. As...

Trump’s rollback of endangered species rules is reckless

–Climate News
4 days ago

The Trump administration’s announcement that it would break with convention in how it interpreted the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to include an evaluation of the economic effects of proposed mitigation efforts was widely _ and appropriately _ decried by environmental groups. They noted that with climate change, more species were facing extinction and need the same regulatory protection that helped save the bald eagle, the California condor and the grizzly bear.

Children's health vulnerable to climate change

–CBC News
5 days ago

Edmonton pediatrician and lead author Dr. Irena Buka says because of their developing bodies, children are more vulnerable than adults to the effects of climate change.

Rivers of Dust: The Future of Water and the Middle East

–Climate News
5 days ago

Whether nations will come together to confront the planet wide crisis is an open question. Otherwise, the Middle East will run out of water — and it will hardly be alone. By 2030, according to the UN, four out of 10 people will not have access to water