Top Stories

Global Survey Finds Widespread Lack of Confidence in US Leadership

–VOA News
5 hours ago

A new survey shows a widespread lack of confidence in U.S. leadership from residents around the world, with only 31 percent approving of the job performance of American leadership, which drops it below global perceptions for both Germany and China.The new poll by Gallup, released Thursday, shows that during President Donald’s Trump second year in office, views of American leadership remained roughly the same after dropping 18 points during Trump’s first year.The report said the U.S. numbers for 2018 “suggest that the doubts sowed in Trump’s first year about U.S.

Amid urgent climate warnings, EPA gives coal a reprieve

–Associated Press
5 hours ago

WASHINGTON (AP) — Amid scientists' increasingly urgent warnings, the Trump administration ordered a sweeping about-face Wednesday on Obama-era efforts to fight climate change, easing restrictions...

Diabetes, cancer and death: These are the effects of polluted air

–CNN
5 hours ago

On Wednesday, the US Environmental Protection Agency under President Trump finalized its rollback of President Obama's signature climate policy -- the Clean Power Plan, which aimed to reduce coal-fired power plant emissions. The administration will replace the plan with the Affordable Clean Energy Rule.

Plastic in every river we tested

–Science News
20 hours ago

In spring earlier this year, we took to the UK’s rivers to investigate microplastic pollution. Each river was so different, from the Lord of the Rings-esqe River Wye which dances along the borders of Wales and England, to the River Aire in Leeds city centre, surrounded by shops and cafes. But the common thread of …

EPA fast tracking chemical reviews amid Trump deregulation push

–Houston Chronicle
20 hours ago

New chemicals coming into the marketplace are getting fast tracked for approval by the EPA, despite bipartisan reforms in 2016 designed to increase scrutiny over chemicals and reduce public health risks, according to a new report by the Environmental Defense Fund.

Trump's Biggest Move to End the ‘War on Coal’ Won't Rescue the Industry

–Bloomberg
1 day ago

(Bloomberg) -- President Donald Trump is scaling back sweeping Obama-era curbs on greenhouse gas emissions from power plants burning coal, his biggest step yet to fulfill his campaign promises to stop a “war" on the fossil fuel.Yet the Environmental Protection Agency’s rewrite of the Clean Power

Boaty McBoatface makes major climate change discovery

–NY Post
1 day ago

Boaty McBoatface has made more of a name for itself. In its maiden mission, the yellow submarine aboard the research vessel RRS Sir David Attenborough made a major discovery about how climate chang…

The World Will Get Half Its Power From Wind and Solar by 2050

–Bloomberg
1 day ago

(Bloomberg) -- Nearly half the world’s electricity will come from renewable energy by 2050 as costs of wind, solar and battery storage continue to plummet.That titanic shift over the next three decades will come as electricity demand increases 62% and investors pump $13.3 trillion into new projects,

Photo of sled dogs walking through water shows reality of Greenland’s melting ice sheet

–Fox News
1 day ago

Steffen Olsen, a scientist with the Danish Meteorological Institute, was on a routine mission in northwest Greenland to retrieve oceanographic and weather monitoring tools placed by his colleagues on sea ice when he ran into a problem. He couldn't see them -- the usually flat white sea ice was covered in water, the result of flooding from Greenland's ice sheet, the second largest on the planet.

Arctic sea ice loss affects the jet stream

–Physics World
3 days ago

The jet stream affects northern hemisphere climates. And global warming affects the behaviour of the jet stream. Prepare for yet more extremes of seasonal weather

BP Warns Of An Unsustainable Path

–Forbes
3 days ago

BP's latest Statistical Review struck a somber tone, with the company warning that the world is on an unsustainable path.

Conflict and Climate Change Drive Global Hunger

–VOA News
4 days ago

A new report by SIPRI, the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, finds conflict and climate change are largely responsible for rising global hunger.   More than 800 million people around the world are going hungry. SIPRI reports 60% are in conflict-affected countries. It says political instability and conflict-related displacement generate food crises.  The Stockholm research institute says food is often inaccessible to people caught in conflict.

What would life be like in a zero-carbon country?

–CNN
4 days ago

Drastic restrictions on almost every aspect of people's lives, from the cars they drive, the way they heat their homes, to the fridges they buy -- even the food stored in them. That is the reality of what awaits us in 2050 if a UK government pledge to cut greenhouse emissions to "net zero" is to be met.

Renewable Energy Is Now The Cheapest Option - Even Without Subsidies

–Forbes
4 days ago

Over recent years the march towards an energy industry ruled by renewables has been on the agenda of many countries and international bodies. Aside from their non-depleting and replenishing nature, renewable energy is poised to lessen the world's carbon footprint and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

The Beyond Meat of fish is coming

–SFGate
4 days ago

Salmon has become the guinea pig of the seas when it comes to using technology to supplement falling fish populations. Now it's moved onto land - and into the laboratory. The fatty orange fish was the second-most-consumed seafood in the U.S. in 2017, after shrimp, and per capita consumption increased 11%, to 2.41 pounds per person, from the prior year, according to the National Fisheries Institute, an industry group. Globally, demand for salmon has skyrocketed, along with that for all fish, fueling overfishing and threatening supply. Industrial-scale salmon farming, once seen as a solution, has its own problems. Massive stocks of smaller fish are depleted to feed farmed salmon, and parasites flourish in salmon pens where farmers use pesticides, contributing to pollution and ecosystem destruction. Sea lice have infested farms in Norway and Scotland in recent years, and a deadly algal bloom killed salmon in Chile, a top farmed-salmon producer. Farmed fish sometimes escape, too, contaminating nearby wild salmon. With rising incomes in developing nations driving demand, fish and seafood now account for almost a fifth of the animal protein people consume. Unsurprisingly, the need for a solution to this less-than-virtuous circle has become evident to a growing number of entrepreneurs and startups. The move toward environmentally conscious salmon farming is already underway. Maynard, Massachusetts-based AquaBounty Technologies is hoping its genetically modified "AquAdvantage" version of Atlantic salmon, which it says grows twice as fast, will soon appear in the shopping carts of the environmentally aware. The company says on its website that its product is raised in "land-based production systems" that eliminate the various risks farmed salmon pose to wild fish, humans and the environment. "The need and the desire for more...

California idea to study phasing out gas-powered cars wins new life

–San Francisco Chronicle
5 days ago

California is on the verge of spending $1.5 million to study what it would take to“significantly reduce” emissions from vehicles — including phasing out new gasoline-powered cars — after a San Francisco legislator used a budget maneuver to bring the idea back from the dead.

Climate change skeptics find White House audience

–SF GATE
5 days ago

WASHINGTON - A Trump administration national security official has sought help from advisers to a think tank that disavows climate change to challenge widely accepted scientific findings on global warming, according to his emails. The request from William Happer, a member of the National Security Council, is included in emails from 2018 and 2019 that were obtained by the Environmental Defense Fund under the federal Freedom of Information Act and provided to the Associated Press. That request was made this past March to policy advisers with the Heartland Institute, one of the most vocal challengers of mainstream scientific findings that emissions from burning coal, oil and gas are damaging the Earth's atmosphere. In a March 3 email exchange Happer and Heartland adviser Hal Doiron discuss Happer's scientific arguments in a paper attempting to knock down climate change as well as ideas to make the work "more useful to a wider readership." Happer writes he had already discussed the work with another Heartland adviser, Thomas Wysmuller. Academic experts denounced the administration official's continued involvement with groups and scientists who reject what numerous federal agencies say is the fact of climate change. "These people are endangering all of us by promoting anti-science in service of fossil fuel interests over the American interests," said Pennsylvania State University climate scientist Michael Mann. "It's the equivalent to formulating antiterrorism policy by consulting with groups that deny terrorism exists," said Northeastern University's Matthew Nisbet, a professor of environmental communication and public policy. The National Security Council declined to make Happer available to discuss the emails. The AP and others reported earlier...

Major oil companies commit to carbon pricing at Vatican

–Associated Press
5 days ago

Some of the world's major oil producers pledged Friday to support "economically meaningful" carbon pricing regimes after a personal appeal from Pope Francis to avoid "perpetrating a brutal act of injustice" against the poor and future generations. The CEOs, as well as leaders

Could the World be Powered Fully by Renewable Sources?

–Science News
5 days ago

Could the World be Powered Fully by Renewable Sources? If the world transitioned out of fossil fuels, could we generate the energy needed to power the world on 100 percent renewable energy?  According to a new report by LUT University in Finland and Energy Watch Group, a German nonprofit, the answer is yes. The nearly five-year-long study simulated a global transition to 100 percent renewable energy by 2050 across all sectors—from power, heat, transport, and water sanitation/desalinization—and demonstrated that a sustainable energy system is more efficient and cost effective than our current energy system.  The world’s population is expected to grow from 7.7 billion in 2019 to 9.7 billion in 2050, and total energy demand is expected to grow by almost two percent annually to keep up with a higher standard of living. To match this growth, the study divided the world into nine major regions and 145 sub-regions. Energy use in these regions and sub-regions were measured hourly within five-year intervals from 2015 until 2050.  Almost all of the energy supply will be produced using a mix of existing and locally available renewable energy sources; the report emphasizes that decentralization of energy production will be vital to increased efficiency. Additionally, our we must transition from fossil fuels to electricity-based sources or biofuels, like biodiesel or algae fuels. Replacing carbon-intensive energy options in the power and heat sectors is possible by 2030, while the transport sector decarbonizes between 2030 and 2050.  The report claims that while energy supply in the fully renewable energy system will be covered by a mix of sources, solar and wind energy will lead the transition. Together, they will make up 88 percent of the total energy supply. The report predicts that a fully renewable global energy system will support an estimated 35 million local jobs, with solar leading job creation.  This report is the first of its kind to analyze a sustainable energy system on an hourly basis at a global level. It is a detailed and thorough study in support of 100 percent renewable energy and a vital testimony for climate change activists. View the full report.

Pollution concern: China’s algal blooms are getting bigger

–Journal News
5 days ago

They may appear visually stunning, especially from satellite images. However, new research traces how toxic bioluminescent microorganisms are becoming increasingly abundant, indicating a growing concern with pollution in China's waters.